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Our Daily Bread
Unser täglich Brot / Our Daily Bread

Director Nikolaus Geyrhalter takes us on a tour through the dizzyingly spectacular landscape of high-tech agriculture: from hermetically sealed chicken hatcheries as sterile as computer chip factories to geospatially precise cultivated fields where crops mature right on cue and on to utopian factories with frightening efficiencies but whose assembly lines would be the perfect setting for a Busby Berkeley musical.

No voice-over commentary and no interviews; just some choice music, and the “whirring, clattering, booming, slurping” hydraulic breathing of heavy machineries.

Unser täglich Brot / Our Daily Bread

Unser täglich Brot / Our Daily Bread

Unser täglich Brot / Our Daily Bread

Unser täglich Brot / Our Daily Bread

Happy Thanksgiving!

2 COMMENTS —
  • mrwilson
  • November 30, 2006 at 1:30:00 PM CST
  • i always want just a bit more from the screening facility at facets, but as usual the actual films keep my feet on the floor. i couldn't help but laugh as baby chicks shuttlecocked through the machinery. it's both a sad and awe-inspiring machine state we have created.


  • Tennessee
  • November 30, 2006 at 11:44:00 PM CST
  • I, too, giggled at the little chicks being tossed like bean bags, but was blown by the condesation of natural patterns. Yesterday, while eating my sandwich and sipping my coffee, while still chewing, I overheard a co-worker assert her belief that cropland, or midwestern fields are not, in any way, beautiful. I wanted to punch her in the face....Fuckin' Hippies. I turned to her and said... "You don't think Ag fields are in any way beautiful?" She said it is a rape of the land. Her response deserved no response. The introverted disapproval and dismissal pleased me fine. I turned, and continued nibbling away at my processed beef bologna sandwich and canned chicken mushroom chowder. Fuckin hippies. Does she know where her carrots came from? 'cause they were probably produced in a more descret yet just as industrial process as any rotation crop.


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